MoneyMagpie

May 06

Lucky me, scammers have offered me a job

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Scammers have offered me a job!

Yesterday I got an email from someone apparently called ‘Faith Weeden’. I don’t know anyone by this name and ‘she’ was emailing me from a hotmail.com address.

The email said:

“Internationally based corporation searching for workers in the United Kingdom for representation work with part-time and full-time schedule options.
Relocation is not required, job seeker will operate from his. Medical and travel fees compensation.
Must be motivated organized person, 18+ age. Salary from 3000 pounds + commission earned.
This position is ideally suit to an individual with demonstrated experience across consumer service, supply chain & logistics within a production environment where quality is high.
Simply respond to this email to get more clear information. Feel free to attach your Resume for a confidential discussion. They are looking forward to discuss the job opportunity with you. ”

Now, if I were looking for part-time, flexible work right now I would probably be interested for a moment at least.

However, because I know about these kinds of emails – very dodgy offers, usually involving me giving them my bank account details and ‘taking money in from customers to send out to their company’ – I was immediately suspicious.

You should be too. If you get one of these emails, delete them immediately and don’t for a moment reply. They’re scammers and they want your email address and, particularly, your money.

Also, tell your friends not to take any notice – send them the link to this blog post so that they know.

There are lots of scams like this around and, as people get more desperate to make some extra cash, there will be even more of them. We need to be ever more vigilant against online and offline scams.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

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Colin Gardiner
Colin Gardiner

Another very common warning sign – the English grammar/phrasing is often poor in these scam e-mails. In your example, there are several such errors: “job seeker will operate from his”(!!); This position is ideally suit to an …”; “to get more clear information.”
One would expect that a reputable company would at the very least be able to phrase their offer properly (though not always a guarantee!!).

Colin Gardiner
Colin Gardiner

Another very common warning sign – the English grammar/phrasing is often poor in these scam e-mails. In your example, there are several such errors: “job seeker will operate from his”(!!); This position is ideally suit to an …”; “to get more clear information.”
One would expect that a reputable company would at the very least be able to phrase their offer properly (though not always a guarantee!!).

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